Archive of Uncategorized

New: Videos, Links, and Book Reviews on AHE

contributeWe are excited to announce that we’ve redesigned our contribute page! Now users and volunteers can submit videos in addition to articles, definitions, book reviews, and web links.

If you know of great content you would like to share with us, go ahead and submit it! Anyone with knowledge of ancient history can submit content to Ancient History Encyclopedia. All submissions are reviewed by our editorial team before publication, to ensure we only have the highest quality of content on our site.

This project depends on users like you to help give all things ancient for free to the teachers, students, and enthusiasts of the world. Thank you so much for your continued support!

We’re on Tumblr, too!

img_logotype_bluebg_2xWe are excited to announce that we now have our own ancient history blog on TumblrFounded in 2007, Tumblr is a microblogging and social networking hybrid platform that houses more than 132 million blogs. It is also among the top 15 websites in the United States of America. We’re excited to share new and reviewed education articles directly to our audience on Tumblr. This further compliments Ancient History Encyclopedia’s other social media pages on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. With nearly 300,000 social media followers and 1.3 million monthly page views, Ancient History Encyclopedia is proud to function as the web’s nexus of “all things ancient.”

International Fall Exhibitions 2012

The change of seasons offers a rich cultural bounty to be partaken by those enthused with ancient history. Four times a year, the Ancient History Encyclopedia likes to present a selection of phenomenal exhibitions that we believe our users and readers would enjoy. For the fall 2012 season, Andean Peru, Greece, China, Mesoamerica, Central Asia, and Arabia are well represented. Please take a moment and check out these listings in order to see if anything of these interest you!

We wish you all a very happy fall or spring (for those of you in the Southern Hemisphere)!

Read more…

LIARI International Conference in Dublin, Ireland

This past spring, the Ancient History Encyclopedia had the immense pleasure of interviewing Dr. Jacqueline Cahill-Wilson, the Chief Investigator for the LIARI (“Late Iron Age Roman Ireland”) Project. This unique and advanced archaeological endeavor is overseen and supported by The Discovery Programme. As distinct from the other public bodies that deal with Irish archaeology, The Discovery Programme’s sole activity is to engage in full-time archaeological and related research, in order to enhance the public’s knowledge of Ireland’s rich and varied past.

Today, we have the pleasure of sharing with you news of The Discovery Programme’s first international interdisciplinary conference, which is scheduled to take place at Trinity College Dublin in Dublin, Ireland from October 20-21, 2012. This special conference will consider how communities in Ireland engaged with the Roman world. Leading academics from Ireland, England, Scotland, Germany, Denmark, and the USA have been invited to present papers from across the subjects of Archaeology, History, Classics, Earth Sciences, Iron Age studies and “Celtic” Studies, covering the Iron Age through to Late Antiquity.

We encourage everyone with even the slightest interest in Ireland, the ancient Celts, and the Romans to read more about this conference and to attend the conference if possible!

Clava Cairns Article by Joshua Mark

Our own Joshua Mark has just published an article about the mysterious Clava Cairns structures in Scotland. Please read his article at The Celtic Guide Magazine. Here’s an brief excerpt:

“Over 4,000 years ago our ancestors raised huge megaliths and positioned them in the earth with care. Sites such as The Ring of Brodgar in Stenness, Orkney, or the famous Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England, mystify and enchant visitors from around the world today. There are many other more modest sites, however, which reward a visitor’s time and effort just as much as these more famous places and, perhaps, more so. Five miles east of the city of Inverness, Scotland, just down from Culloden Moor, rests one such site: the Balnuaran of Clava – popularly known as Clava Cairns….”

Winning at the ancient Games

by Jan van der Crabben July 22, 2012 Uncategorized 0 Comments

With the Olympic Games 2012 coming to London, the British Museum in London has created a new trail through the museum titled “Winning at the ancient Games”. The trail takes visitors to twelve objects in the museum that reveal more about the Olympic Games in ancient times. If you are in London, have a look — it’s free!

Doggerland Recreated in 3D

by Jan van der Crabben July 10, 2012 Uncategorized 0 Comments

Doggerland, the sunken land bridge between Britain and the European continent, has been recreated in 3D by a team of scientists. They used the computer game engine of Far Cry to create a stone age village, showing how the rising sea level might have forced the village’s inhabitants to move. SPIEGEL Online has published a slideshow.

The Celtic Guide Magazine

We wanted to alert our readers and followers that there is an excellent new e-publication dedicated solely to Celtic history, mythology, art, folklore, and culture: The Celtic Guide. All the editions are free and can be easily downloaded or printed. Many of their contributors are renown experts in their field of interest while others are university educated in Celtic related studies. If you prefer, follow their blog or find them on Facebook. Enjoy!

AHE In So Many More Languages!

by Jan van der Crabben June 08, 2012 Uncategorized 0 Comments

We have just added Google Translate to AHE. While it’s not perfect, it will help many of our international readers. You can find it at the bottom of every page. Did you know that you can help improve the translation? Simply hold your mouse over a badly-translated sentence for a few seconds and you can correct the translated text.